Woodlands.co.uk

Water Purification in the Woodlands

By woodlandstv

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Paul Beadle divulges some survival skills. With water, more has to go in than comes out, he tells us, and sometimes contaminated water is all that's available. These essential survival skills are explained and taught in detail so that all listeners have a chance!

A CAN FILM
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commissioned by Woodlands TV

www.cdwes.co.uk
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Discussion

Ditch water doesn't seem to harm the frogs…

WoodlandsTV

June 5, 2013

Can you make a bushcraft version of that military water filter? I saw a video a long time ago about that, but can't recall the method and the material? You have any idea? Thanks!

B Charron

June 5, 2013

What kind of piping do you use? Is it part copper and part pvc? thanks!

B Charron

June 5, 2013

Hi Thanks for your interest.

The first section of the pipe work is 15mm copper pipe after that I used 15mm plastic pipe. you need to experiment with the length of pipe to get a good rate of condensation.

I think the military version of a water filter you are referring to is a Milbank bag. This basically two layers of fine cotton with activated charcoal suspended in-between. I'm not sure if you can get them anymore as the technology has moved on.

Paul Beadle

June 7, 2013

The method demonstrated works very well for purifying salt water. When doing this you are left with salt residue when all the water is boiled off. In theory you should also have the residue from 'muddy water' left after all the water has boiled off. As this has been super heated it will be safer to use than before, but not sterile as you would need to use an autoclave for this.

Paul Beadle

June 7, 2013

Thumbs up stuff

Hugh Mungas

June 11, 2013

Dont get the meaning, more in than out ,surely the rush straw wont destroy mico organisms

Logibear kyt

August 18, 2013


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