Woodlands.co.uk

Smoking Food in a Hollow Tree

By woodlandstv

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The Foragers are a team of hunter-gatherers who run a wild food pub in St Albans. They regularly head into the woods on foraging adventures. In this video the Foragers turned a hollow tree into a smoker, capable of hot smoking a pheasant and cold smoking cheese at the same time. A new way of cooking out in the wild.

To learn more about The Foragers and their wild experiences, check www.foragewell.com


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Discussion

Brilliant thanks for sharing

Paul Boyle

March 9, 2018

An interesting example of a cooking technique which would have been used in early human history and relevent to bushcraft and survival today. A minor downside will be the loss of habitat to deadwood wildlife.

It's fallen trees like this, that are important for eco-systems. Providing both food like insects and habitat. Not mentioning the fungi, mosses and many other reasons there are for allowing fallen trees in the woodland, to just do their thing..

James Allen

March 9, 2018

'ray mears squat' – instantly knew what pose that meant hahaha

Gregor Vorbarra

March 9, 2018

What is the music? were can i find it? Thanks

Level3-RC

May 7, 2018

Thats truly epic way to go aye they did smoke a lot food that in olden times because it was far better & healther to eat

Tiny Elf

November 10, 2018

To all you whinging armchair conservationists, you don't have a fucking clue. 90% of the log was undamaged by the fire. Within a few months woodland life in the log would have returned to normal. Charcoal and wood ash provide nutrients for the soil. Educate yourself before you spout rubbish.

Anon amous

December 4, 2018

In "olden times" they knew nothing about nutrition. They smoked food to preserve it.

Anon amous

December 4, 2018

​@Anon amous one way to go pop or go with a bang with full belly lol​

Tiny Elf

December 16, 2018

I first learned this froman anime COOKING MASTER BOY smoke fish cooking

philip japitana

September 19, 2019


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